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Small arms and light weapons among pastoral groups in the Kenya–Uganda border area

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dc.contributor.author Mkutu, Kennedy A
dc.date.accessioned 2015-09-24T06:19:56Z
dc.date.available 2015-09-24T06:19:56Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Mkutu, Kennedy Agade. "Small arms and light weapons among pastoral groups in the Kenya–Uganda border area." African Affairs 106.422 (2007): 47-70. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11732/895
dc.description.abstract Recent decades have seen an escalation in interethnic resource conflicts and banditry among pastoralists in the Kenya-Uganda border region, fuelled by a growing number of small arms. State management has been largely unsuccessful and often counterproductive in reducing numbers of small arms. The creation of paramilitary institutions in rural Kenya and Uganda are an example of how legal arms are entering communities and intensifying the conflicts further. Understanding the sources and mechanisms of arms acquisition is a significant step in curbing the violence. The main sources and routes, and the current costs of arms and ammunition are provided. More important however is to appreciate the complex reasons behind the demand for small arms. Relationships with states, alienation of pastoral land, cultural issues and questions of livelihood are all examined, using empirical evidence collected by the author between 2001 and 2005. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.title Small arms and light weapons among pastoral groups in the Kenya–Uganda border area en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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