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The Effect of a Multi-Generational Workforce on Employee Productivity: A Case Study of Kenya Electricity Generating Company

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dc.contributor.author Wangechi, Joan Mwangi
dc.date.accessioned 2015-05-05T11:43:53Z
dc.date.available 2015-05-05T11:43:53Z
dc.date.issued 2014-08-30
dc.identifier.uri http://erepo.usiu.ac.ke/11732/73
dc.description A Research Project Submitted to the Chandaria School of Business in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Executive Master of Science in Organizational Development (EMOD) en_US
dc.description.abstract The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of multi-generational workforce on employee productivity. The research questions were as follows; How does multi-generational perceptual differences on human resource development practices affect employee productivity? What effect does multi-generational perceptual differences on reward management practices have on employee productivity? What effect does multi-generational perceptual differences regarding employee relations practices have on employee productivity? The study used case study research design. The study population comprised of 2049 employees of Kengen. Stratified sampling technique was used to determine a sample size of 204 staff drawn from the Company’s five branches namely: Central Office, Thermal, Western and Eastern Hydro and Geothermal. The data collection tool used was a structured questionnaire. Frequency distributions were used in the descriptive statistics part of the study and One-Way ANOVA was used to analyze the statistical significance of the multigenerational perceptual differences on human resource development, reward management and employee relations and subsequent effect on employee productivity. The data was analyzed using SPSS as a tool. The findings showed that, in terms of the multi-generational perceptual differences on human resource development practices and its effect on employee productivity, 59.8% of the respondents agreed that the company offered regular training opportunities for all its’ staff and that the training programs offered by the company were sensitive to their needs and preferences as individuals. ANOVA test showed that the differences between the mean scores of the perceptions of Millenials (18-33 years), Generation Xers (34-48 years) and Baby Boomers (49-60 years) was not statistically significant at (p<.05) level in all the dimensions of HRD. In terms of the effect that multi-generational perceptual differences regarding reward management practices have on employee productivity, 58.6% of the respondents agreed that they were fairly remunerated for the job they were employed to perform at the company and 59.5% were satisfied with the work arrangement in the company that provided them with a good work-life balance. In addition, 70.5% of the respondents agreed that they felt a sense of job security while working with the company. However, the differences between the mean scores of the perceptions of Millenials (18-33 years), Generation Xers (34-48 years) and Baby Boomers (49-60 years) was not statistically significant at (p<.05) level in all the dimensions of reward management practices at Kengen. The findings regarding the effect that multi-generational perceptual differences with employee relations practices have on employee productivity showed that 56.8% of the respondents agreed that they were always informed before decisions that affect me at the company are made. Similarly, 59.5% of the respondents agreed that their boss always made them feel appreciated and valued and that they were allowed space and autonomy to do their work without being micromanaged. In addition, 67.6% of the respondents were satisfied with the rules and procedures they were expected to follow. However, the differences between the mean scores of the perceptions of Millenials (18-33 years), Generation Xers (34-48 years) and Baby Boomers (49-60 years) was not statistically significant at (p<.05) level in all the dimensions of employee relations practices. The study concluded that employee productivity did not vary with multi-generational perceptual differences with regards to the various dimensions of human resource development practices at the company. Similarly, there were no perceptual differences across the different generational cohorts at Kengen with regards to all aspects of reward management practices. Further, multi-generational perceptual differences played an insignificant role in the nexus between employee relations practices and employee productivity. It was recommended that human resource development practices at the company should apply universally across the different generational cohorts. All aspects of reward management should adhere to the doctrine of equity. In order to enhance productivity, the communication culture of the company should foster a sense of employee involvement and participation through consultation especially on matters concerning their work and employment at the company. Other case studies should be replicated for comparison purposes. en_US
dc.publisher United States International University - Africa en_US
dc.subject Employee Productivity en_US
dc.subject Multi-Generational Workforce en_US
dc.title The Effect of a Multi-Generational Workforce on Employee Productivity: A Case Study of Kenya Electricity Generating Company en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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